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narrative of a lot of manufacturers leaving china for vietnam, indonesia, bangladesh, mexico. this is really part of a decades-long trend. >> i have to leave it there. gordon chang, thank you very much. be sure to catch the tim cook interview tonight on "rock center with brian williams." that's at 10:00 p.m. central. >>> the french ought to stick with fine foods because we found out that their 75% tax rate on the rich doesn't work. the economy there is tanking, even worse, same story in britain. why would we want to copy their policies here in the usa? i'll try to get some answers in a moment. please stay with us. [ male announcer ] how do you trade? with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at your fingertips. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. try our easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. in that time th
greed to take jobs and cheap labor markets so they can get right to work law states in indonesia and china and then made right to work law here. it means it's a gap between the wealth and the workers. workers have a right to expect liberal wages, health care, education care, the right to vote protected, and educate their children. these rights are reasonable and should be enforced. >> reverend jackson, you and i have known each other a long time. did you ever think you would be in michigan leading a protest against right to work? >> i really did not. i think that the tea party has 150-year-old roots between what is -- the right it organize, collective bargaining and states rights. i never thought it would go this far north, and, yet, these workers in this state must fight back and draw a line in the sand. that's why i'm going to address a major one-day strike, maybe a one-day march on washington for massive and action to bring about the ship in the flow of the wind. >> reverend jesse jackson, bob king from the united autoworkers. thank you very much. i know it's a cold day. thank
and still emitting a very strong radio signal and it just passed over indonesia. >> what would that mean then if you lose control ever that satellite, what then? >> it could tumble down to earth. here is the big story, the fact that north koreans were able to get this satellite into space in the first place. they had the delivery system on this rocket which is basically the same as -- the same delivery system as there typodone ii system. that is the missile system they've been testing for years and years annex tepbld the range so it could reach the continental united states. this is scary. they are closer to having a missile that could reach the united states. bill: it's far more serious especially when you consider the sanctions on this country. if has been labeled a success, whether you're for it or the rest of the world is against this. i'm going to show you, sir, to our viewers at home here, here is north korea, this missile shot off from the east coast of north korea. you had a little of it land here in the yellow sea and a little bit more down here in the philippines. here is what
including the largest, indonesia, in which the muslims participate in the democracy and you have the political parties within that system, so i think when we have discussions especially these days given the turmoil in the middle east we are very focused on the 20% of the muslim world and six and ten of the muslims live in the pacific region and we need to keep their experiences in mind and think about the death of their experiences, but the main point which i think we all agree on is there is nothing and it is anti-democratic about islam in terms of political culture and needing more than christianity or judea's some so we agree on that point. second, and this is where we disagree. given the middle east which i think we are going to focus on today, the crushing social democratic economic political pressures in the societies are facing a change is coming and i've lived in this part of the world for five years back in 1990 and i go back regularly and support the notion as it is crafted in part because i think it is like debating how gravity. you see the early results in some, not m
pluralistic will be forced to rescind this in indonesia. in 2002, the largest muslim country got about 41% of the vote. not a majority, but they declined over the last couple of years to 29%. need to keep what are examples of when we talk about what's coming ahead in the middle east because i believe we are in the early stages of transformation and we'll talk about the complex power. a final point i hope we debate a little bit people certainly talk later today. the history of u.s. policy. it's an idea that two years this transition and i would call it arab awakening or arab spring. it's too early to characterize. we've only seen for country see their leadership change. it's very, very early. but the u.s. at this stage, the debate talks about how we actually adapt and become more nimble to these events. both in terms of how we deal with political islam and all other act or spirit we need to figure out how to judiciously engage support to a key factor, which are talked about here are not islamist forces. if you look at the most recent election results, there's a desire and hunger for divers
:12:12. >> we're still here. >> make a wish and celebrate. >> indonesia got married here. we have pictures from singapore. lots of weddings. i get married on 2-2-02 and that wasn't very lucky. here's a guy in france trying to synchronize his watch. he missed it by 25 seconds because he had 38 seconds at the bottom. even here a mass in lithuania here a couple hours ago. it's national sound check today. it's check one, two, one, two. >> i get it. so this is considered to be a lucky day for a lot of people. how long before another one of these? >> you have to wait for january 1, 3001. >> okay. it's going to be a while. i won't be here for that one. >> we have to count on other folks to bring that in. all right. thanks, chad. we're going to take a quick break. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, char
the world, bought a helmet for a teen in indonesia driving without one. #20acts. join us in remembering the kids in connecticut. a tragedy that ended 26 lives at one school now touching so many. we heard robert parker, the father of one young victim emilie, speak to emotionally over the weekend. he released an additional statement last night, calling on everyone to use the memories of the victims to inspire us to do good and work toward bettering our communities. savannah? >> all right, andrea canning, thank you. out of such sadness, such a great idea to do something kind for somebody else. >> pay it forward. we talk about this all the time. it's sad that tragedy reminds us. >> but that this can live on and honor their memories. >> and you do have an opportunity to elevate this kind of loss. and people i think are trying to do that. that's the best thing to try to do right now. >> best way to remember those that were lost. we are back with much more today on a tuesday morning after a check of your local news and weather. >> good morning at 8:56. an mta roadside assistance technician is
father, raised in indonesia and hawaii. i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so, to see this man, this center, this powerful an accomplished person, when it came to what you think the senator might look like at the time, the way that he commanded the respect of the entire nation, it hinted to me what might be possible for my own life. this was a man that stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man that believed in america even when its government did not necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i could not put into words. as i watched the hearings, listening to his piercing questions night after night, i learned how a democracy was supposed to work. a government of, by, and for the people. nobody is above the law. we have an obligation to hold each other countable. these things that we stand for, the ideals that we hold dear, they are bigger than any one person, party, or politician. nobody communicated that
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)